Classroom Etiquette – Are You a Good Student?

5 Tips to be a better student

By Mary Covey

We all enjoy taking a class to learn something new. At the end of most classes we are asked to evaluate the teacher. But have we ever thought about evaluating ourselves as students? It takes more than just being on time to be a good student.  Here are a few tips that have helped me get the most from my classroom experience.

  • Sign up for class as soon as you know you are interested. The class may be full if you wait until the last minute or a class could be cancelled because not enough students signed up.
  • Read the class description and know the skill level. Do not sign up for an advanced class if you are just a beginner. The teacher will have to spend lots of time helping you with skills that you should already know. This will be frustrating to you, the other students, but most of all the teacher.
  • Arrive a few minutes early and be prepared. Have the necessary supplies and make sure you know how to use them.
  • Turn off cell phones, keep conversation to a minimum, and pay attention to the teacher. Do not monopolize the teacher’s time. A good teacher will try to spend some individual time with each student.
  • Fill out the teacher evaluation form honestly. Be constructive about both the teacher and her handout material. Don’t ask for extra handouts for friends who did not attend the class. The teacher’s handouts are copyright protected, never, never copy them. They are intended for your use only. Do not take the class back to your guild or stitch group to teach it, this is also a violation of the copyright law unless you have written permission from the teacher.

Next time you take a class remember these simple tips, relax, and have fun being a good student.

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Defining Success

By Mary Covey

Defining Success

I believe I have been sewing all my life. As a child my grand mother taught me to thread a needle and sew on a button before I was six years old. With lots of trail and error, I taught myself how to use a sewing machine when I was seven. Over the years I worked at improving my skills so that I could make my own clothes.  A master seamstress named Minnie White let me come to her house every Saturday afternoon for a whole summer when I was twelve. She taught me how to measure, fit, and cut a pattern. Her motto was “always try to improve your skills and do your best” (the seam ripper and I became close friends). The suit I made over the course of that summer won a blue ribbon at the state fair.

When I wanted to learn to make a quilt, I took a class at Cotton Patch Fabrics in Tulsa, Oklahoma from Janette Metz, a master quilter. In Janette I saw that same patient spirit and willingness to share her knowledge that I had seen in Minnie. Again I heard the words “do your best” and “always try to improve”. The lessons Minnie and Janette gave became the foundation for all the work I have done since. There are others who have shared their knowledge with me – Betty Terrell, Nancy Mullman, Jane Green, Linda Jenkins, Becki Goldsmith, Ruth Faye, Ellen Medlock, Jane Lewis, Julie Scribner, Larry Black, Nancy Martin, Mary Green, Shirley Pittinger and the list could go on and on. All of these people took the time to share some of their knowledge with me. They are all successful women in my eyes.

Are you a teacher? Do you strive to improve your skills everyday for the benefit of your students?  Do you reach out to each of your students to help them improve? Do you take classes from experts to stay current in your field? Do your students feel like a success when they finish your class?

We have the ability to support and promote others to “do their best”. Kind words of encouragement can make a difference for all of us. We can all be successful if we reach out as often as possible to support and promote our students, friends, and family.

Scrappy Star Quilt with floral backing

Scrappy Star Quilt with floral backing

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Waiting for Perfection

By Mary Covey

When I saw this photo on Pinterest, perfection is the first word that came to mind.  Think about all the things that had to be in place for the photographer to get this amazing shot. The right camera, the right lens, the right location, the right lighting, it all had to be there ready for the big moment to happen. Lots of hard work –  just waiting for perfection. The thought of the “perfect moment” can be so daunting that we do nothing for fear of failing. As a quilter, an author, and business person, I am always thinking of ways to prepare myself for opportunities that might be perfect for me.

bird and frond


I set daily, weekly, and monthly goals that are all preparing me for the opportunities ahead. I work hard to master the skills I have and even harder to master new ones while constantly making adjustments. I have many failures. They make me very grateful for every small success. I urge all of my students and readers to take time to review your goals whatever they may be.  Ask your self  “What are my goals?” “Where do I need to improve my skills?”  “How can I prepare myself for opportunities?” Don’t let the anticipation of the “perfect moment” freeze you in your tracks, let it propel you into action!

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Creativity to Cash – How To Start a Home Based Business

Creativity to Cash Logo

 

By Mary Covey

In my latest post I announced that I will be teaching a class for Jenks Community Education titled “Creativity to Cash – How to Start a Home Based Business”.  The class will take you through the basic steps needed to start a home based business. We will explore ways to profit from your hobby, how to make a business plan, create visibility and branding, and organization. You can view information about the class and register at www.jenkscommunityed.com or call 918-298-0340.

If you like my chalkboard logo above, you can read how to make your own chalkboard art here.

#entreprenuer #smallbusiness #biztips

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