For the Record

By Mary Covey

Most quilters are drawn to the warmth and beauty of antique quilts. We like to collect and display them whenever possible. Many of these quilts have intricate hand stitching, unusual fabrics, and are made from patterns with long forgotten names. Fabric historians and journals written by the quilters have helped in documenting information about many antique quilts that are parts of museum collections. But what about quilts that you find at garage sales, flea markets, and antique stores? Do you ever wonder who the maker was, what was the name of the pattern, or how old is the quilt? I do.

3 Ways to Take Care of Antique Quilts #quilting #marycoveydesigns

Antique quilt from the 1930’s.

The block above is from a quilt made in the 1930’s. I know this because several of the blocks in the quilt have the year embroidered on them. So while we know approximately when it was made, the name of the maker, the name of the owner, the pattern name, and the occasion for which it was made are all a mystery. I have written a previous post on labeling your quilts, which should be a part of any quilt making process, but have you ever thought of making a record keeping system for your quilts?

The easiest way to keep a record of information about your quilts is to develop a basic form and fill it out each time you make a quilt. It can be something as simple as an 8 1/2″ x 11″ sheet of paper or as elaborate as a binder system made specifically for a quilt maker’s record keeping.  Many of my friends use a spiral bound notebook that costs about a dollar that you can purchase just about any where. My favorite way is to create this document as part of an electronic file and save it on my computer.

The following is a list of information to include in your record:

  • Project or quilt number. Assign each project or quilt a number when you start. Then fill in the information as your work progresses.
  • Name. This is not necessary but most quilters do name their projects.
  • Pattern name and manufacturer. An example would be – “Happy Birthday Baby” pattern designed by Mary Covey from the book “Celebrations” published by Martingale & Company 2002.
  • Piecing. Was the quilt pieced by hand or machine? Was it made by one person or several? Be sure to include everyone’s name.
  • Quilting.  Record whether the quilt was hand or machine quilted and by whom.
  • Special information. Record if the quilt has appeared in any shows or publications. In each instance, record the name of the show/publication, date, awards won or page number.
  • Quilt owner. Even if you are making the quilt for yourself, make sure you record who is the owner. You may think everyone knows who you made the quilt for but unless you write it down, nobody will. If you are giving the quilt as a gift, make sure this information is on the label.
  • Maker’s notes. This is where I like to record the story behind the quilt. What was the inspiration for making the quilt – a wedding, a birthday, a new baby, a gift for a special friend?
  • Pictures. Take a photograph of your quilt or project. If you keep a paper record write the number of the project on the back of the photo in case it gets separated for the recorded sheet. Photos can be easily added to electronic files and saved.

Remember it is never too late to start keeping a record of your quilts. Chances are you know who you gave a quilt to or you might even still own them.  Start taking pictures and recording the history of as many of them as you can. You’ll be glad you did.

 

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Inspirations for Quilting!

By Mary Covey

“Where do you get the inspiration for new quilting designs?” is one of the questions that I am  most frequently asked and one of the easiest to answer. Inspiration is all around us in everything from architecture to nature.

Many of the fabrics used by quilters are drawn or photographed directly from nature. Shapes you might be familiar with include grass, leaves, ferns, flowering plants and animals. The beautiful cabbage rose pictured below is just one example.

Shapes that are more geometric in their design are often drawn from everyday architecture. Windows, fence rails, gates, and doorways are examples of places that influence my quilting designs. Pictured below are a few of the pictures that I took to add to my ideas.

Take some pictures the next time you are out and about – you will be amazed at the inspirations you will find.

design inspirations2

 

design inspirations3

 

design inspirations

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Photo Finish

By Mary Covey

I believe that a good photo is the best present that anyone can give or receive. Every photo represents a moment and memory in time. I try to take as many photos as I can, so that a history can be created of how our family has changed. Sometimes they turn out good sometimes not so good. So isn’t it wonderful when you find a photographer that captures a beautiful photo of your family?

As many hours as we put into the making of a quilt, most of us think of our quilts as family. But have you ever thought of having them photographed? Well, recently I did just that. I used Sarah Chloe Photography studio to make a photo history of my quilts.  Sarah Neumyer is the owner and talented photographer that helped me with my project.

Scrappy Star Quilt with floral backing

Scrappy Star Quilt with floral backing

It was interesting to watch Sarah work. After looking through my stack of quilts she developed a plan. Much like a quilter pulls her fabrics together for a project, Sarah pulled together her props and ideas for the locations. We started at her studio in Bixby. The Scrappy Star quilt was taken on the steps of an old barn behind her studio.

Antique Dresden Plate

Antique Dresden Plate

DSC_7051

DSC_7051

Photo FinishThen on to a location. Sarah used this old truck as the perfect backdrop for my Antique Dresden Plate. There were lots of pictures taken here but this is one of my favorites.

 

Wool Partridge Quilt

Wool Partridge Quilt

It was interesting to watch her lay out an assortment of quilts and then edit her selections for each photo. Sarah definitely has a talent for knowing exactly what is just right.

On the Vine

On the Vine

One the Vine is a miniature pattern that I designed several years ago using Moda flannels and a P&B floral print. The sunlight hitting these colors really makes them pop.

Sarah’s specialty is children and family portraits. She did and excellent job of photographing my quilt family. To see more of Sarah’s work or to talk with her about photographing your quilts, go to www.sarahchloephotography.com.

#photography #quilt #photofinish

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Craftsy’s 5 Million Member Flash Sale!

By Mary Covey

(sponsored post)

Don’t miss Craftsy’s 5 Million Member Flash Sale happening now! Get up to 50% off select online classes for a limited time only! Hurry, this offer expires on October 13th, 2014 at 11:59 PM MT. Shop Craftsy‘s 5 Million Member Flash Sale now and save.

 

Craftsy's Fat Quarter Frenzy Sale

Craftsy’s Fat Quarter Frenzy Sale

 

Craftsy's Flash Sale Photography Classes

Craftsy’s Flash Sale
Photography Classes

 

Craftsy's Flash Sale Quilting Classes

Craftsy’s Flash Sale
Quilting Classes

 

Craftsy's Flash Sale Quilting Classes

Craftsy’s Flash Sale
Quilting Classes

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